Green Garlic and Kale

Last week at the farmers market, I found some green garlic. I’ve had green garlic before that looks more like spring onions, but as you can see from the picture here, this bunch of green garlic was a little more mature. I’d never worked with it this way before but the nice guy who sold it to me assured me that practically the whole thing is edible. So I was sold!

In order to use green garlic in this state, it is necessary to remove the hard central stalk. To do this, I cut the bulb end off and then cut that in half. I removed the roots and the inner stalk. Then I peeled off the outer two or three layers, which are thin, kind of like spring onion. Inside the bulb, the cloves had only just started to show signs of differentiating. For the stalk, I used the tip of a knife to score its length, and pulled out the hard stalk from the center. Then I washed the leaves the same way that you would wash leeks, and trimmed the ends. I sliced the stalk into ribbons, and chopped the bulb.

The flavor of green garlic is extremely mild when eaten raw, and won’t leave you with bad breath. So I decided to use it in a raw kale salad. If you don’t have access to green garlic, this recipe goes great with anything that has a mild onion or garlic flavor. I’ve done it with green garlic, spring onions, and shallots each quite successfully. To further amp up the garlic flavor even further, use garlic oil.

This recipe makes a lot, but the salad keeps well in the fridge for days and makes a great snack.

Green Garlic and Kale Salad

Ingredients

  • 2 bunches of kale, leaves removed from the stem
  • 1 chopped green garlic bulb or two finely diced shallots
  • 1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 3/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp freshly ground pepper
  • 1/2 cup olive oil or garlic oil

Method

Roughly chop or slice the kale and place in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, combine the remaining ingredients and whisk to emulsify. Pour over the kale and use tongs (or your hands) to toss. Make sure the kale is evenly coated. Set aside to let the kale wilt slightly at room temperature for 30 minutes or longer (an hour would be great). Taste, and adjust seasoning if necessary.

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Peas and Carrots with Mint

English peas are one of my favorite spring time veggies. And I know it’s kind of old-fashioned of me, but when I get my hands on some, I just cannot resist making peas and carrots. I have memories of eating peas and carrots when I was a kid but I can’t remember if they were made from fresh or from a can. Whichever it was, I’m just glad that I can recreate that taste memory as an adult, with my own twist.

At my farmers market, there are usually two options for english peas. You can buy them whole in the pod, or you can buy them already shelled. The shelled ones cost a premium, and I don’t mind the time it takes to shell the whole ones so that’s usually what I go for. Shelling peas is also a great job for a kid or a partner who wants to help.

As far as modifications go, the sky’s the limit on this one. You could certainly substitute frozen peas for this dish (but I make no guarantees as to its success). You can also play around a lot with the ratio of peas to carrots, depending on what you like. Pretty much any fresh herb will play well with this dish, I’ve done it with parsley, basil, and dill, but mint is my favorite.

I also don’t cook the carrots very much because I don’t like mushy carrots, but if you like them softer, just give them a few more minutes in the pan before you add the peas.

This recipe makes a lot, so halve it if you aren’t sure how much you want. It reheats well, and I have certainly been known to eat cold peas and carrots for breakfast…

Peas and Carrots

Ingredients

  • 2 quarts whole english peas, shelled OR 3 cups shelled fresh or frozen peas
  • 4 or 5 medium carrots, cut into pea-sized dice
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon of olive oil, garlic oil, or earth balance
  • 2 tsp salt
  • A few dashes fresh cracked black pepper
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh mint

Method

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add carrots and cook 1-2 minutes. Add peas and cook another 3-4 minutes, or until all the veggies are done to your liking. Season with salt and pepper. Remove from heat and stir in the fresh herbs.

Serves 4

Spicy Ginger Peanut Noodles


I cannot tell a lie: this is one of my favorite noodle recipes to eat.

It’s not because I love peanut butter, and ginger, and sesame. It’s not because I love that you can make this as spicy or as mild as you like. It’s not because it’s super easy, although all those things are nice too.

It’s really because every time I make it, it’s a little different. Depending on what fresh ingredients I have in my fridge or growing in my herb garden, I can always change it up a little, and it always tastes amazing and fresh. And because of that, it’s easy to customize the recipe to include ingredients that you love, so that you can make it just the way you like it. Like a little extra heat? Just go for the max number of thai chilis. Like it a little milder? Seed one jalapeno and use that instead. Hate carrots? Leave ’em out. Crazy for ginger? Up the quantity to two tablespoons….

TIP: Smaller chilis are more potent than larger chilis of the same variety. Chilis grown in a hotter, more humid climate are spicier than those grown in a cool, dry climate.

TIP: If using the optional vegetarian “chicken,” read ingredients carefully before you buy to make sure that your variety is vegan. Also, look for brands that are made in the USA; brands made in taiwan or china may not include all ingredients on the label, and may not be vegetarian at all. If I am using vegetarian “chicken,” I go to my local asian mega-mart and look there. They carry US brands, and they are typically much cheaper than popular grocery store brands such as Morningstar Farms.

What other fresh ingredients would YOU add to these noodles?

Spicy Ginger Peanut Noodles

Ingredients

  • 12 oz spaghetti, preferably whole wheat
  • 1 tsp toasted sesame oil
  • 1/4 cup white sesame seeds
  • 3 tbsp peanut butter (chunky, smooth, or other)
  • 3 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
  • 1 tbsp fresh ginger, finely diced
  • 5 tbsp soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp rice vinegar
  • 1 -4 thai chilis, chopped (or 1 jalapeno, chopped, or 1 tsp tabasco sauce)
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar
  • 2-3 tbsp water
  • 2 tbsp black (or white) sesame seeds
  • 2 carrots, peeled and grated
  • 4 spring onions, sliced on the bias
  • 8 oz vegetarian “chicken” shreds, or strips sliced into long, thin pieces (optional)
  • Any other veggies or herbs  you want to add (i.e. celery or chilis sliced on the bias; shredded raw kohlrabi, turnip, or jicama; fresh parsley, mint, or chives; etc.)

Method

Break spaghetti in half before cooking (this will make it easier to distribute the rest of the ingredients evenly at the end). Cook pasta to al dente in salted water according to package directions. Drain, and place in a very large bowl. Add toasted sesame oil to the pasta, and use tongs to toss the spaghetti in the oil; this will keep it from sticking.

Meanwhile, place 1/4 cup sesame seeds in a dry pan, and toast over medium heat until aromatic and just starting to brown a little. Set aside to cool a little bit.

Place peanut butter, garlic, ginger, soy sauce, rice vinegar, chilis or hot sauce, brown sugar, and toasted sesame seeds into your blender. Blend until smooth. Add water 1 tablespoon at a time, until the mixture is the consistency of cream.

Pour the dressing over the noodles. Add the black sesame seeds, carrots, spring onions, veggie  chicken, and any other veggies or herbs to the bowl. Use tongs to toss. Serve room temperature or cold.

Makes about 8 servings.

Szechuan Greens

turnip greens-091017-0003One of my husband’s friends gave us some Szechuan peppercorns a while ago as a gift. I was pretty stoked to get them, but didn’t have any immediate plans for them so I stuck them in a cupboard and kind of forgot they were there for a while.

turnip greens-091017-0002I don’t know why I remembered them all of a sudden on the weekend, but I decided to pair them up with some turnip greens that I had left over after making my slaw. Maybe I wanted to go Szechuan because I find turnip greens to be pleasantly bitter and a little bit spicy on their own, or maybe it was because I had just made another asian-inspired dish, I don’t know. But the results were delicious! And the good news is that I think this recipe would work with any kind of greens, not just turnip.

The Szechuan peppercorns really brought a nice flowery note to the dish. They don’t actually have a lot of heat themselves like black or white peppercorns do. If you’re not sure, try eating one whole, I think you will be surprised.

But back to the star of the show: Turnip greens.

One of the nice things about turnip greens is that you don’t have to remove all the stems, like you do with greens like chard and collards and kale; however I do trim away the larger stems closer to the root end if they seem tough. The parts of the stem that are still attached to the leaves are typically nice and tender. You can cook them at the same rate as the leaves, and they add a pleasant crunch to the dish.

Another nice thing about turnip greens is nutrition. Like most greens, they are low in calories, fat-free, cholesterol-free, high in fiber, and a great source of vitamins A, C, E, folate, calcium, B6, trace minerals, and chlorophyl, to name a few.

Can you believe that some people throw these delicious and nutritious beautiful babies away?

I like to use a wok for cooking greens, but use any large pot or pan that has a lid. This recipe makes enough for two large servings, or maybe 4 smaller side servings.

Szechuan Greens

Ingredients

    turnip greens-091017-0001

  • 1 tsp Szechuan peppercorns
  • 1 tsp chili oil or toasted sesame oil
  • pinch of salt
  • pinch of cayenne pepper (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 tsp canola oil
  • 1 tsp crushed chile flakes (optional)
  • 2 bunches turnip greens, trimmed and chopped
  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Method

Toast szechuan peppercorns in a dry wok until just fragrant. Transfer to a spice grinder or mortar & pestle and grind.

To make the dressing, whisk together the ground peppercorns, chili or sesame oil, salt, cayenne (if using), rice wine vinegar, and sugar. Set aside.

Heat the canola oil in the wok until it is shimmering, and add the crushed chile flakes if using. Cook the chili flakes for about a minute. Add the turnip greens and toss to coat with the oil. Cook until they are wilted but still bright green, continuing to stir and toss them frequently. Put the lid on the pot when not stirring.

When the greens are tender and emerald colored, remove from the heat, and pour the dressing over top. Add the sesame seeds, and toss to coat. Serve hot, garnished with some extra sesame seeds if desired. Leftovers will last in the fridge for 2-3 days, and they taste good cold too.

Kohlrabi and Turnip Spicy Asian Slaw

kholrabi slaw-091017-0003One of the cool things about doing a CSA is that from time to time something shows up in your share that you’ve never seen before. This week for me, it was kohlrabi.

If you’ve never tasted it, kohlrabi has a very mild, pleasant flavor. I found it to be kind of cabbagey tasting, in a very good way. It also has a very satisfying crunch which reminds me of broccoli. Apparently when kohlrabi is very young, you can eat it without having to peel it. But the outer layer of the large specimen we got was fibrous and tough, and it definitely needed to be peeled.

Our share this week also contained a bunch of turnips, and I had some left over carrots from the farmers market too. In light of this, I figured it was slaw time.

The dressing on this slaw is one that I use all the time with a shredded cabbage base, so feel free to sub in about a half of a head of cabbage if kohlrabi and turnips aren’t your thing.

This makes about 6-8 cups of slaw. When I’ve made (the cabbage version of) this in the past, I’ve often doubled it because it’s so tasty, and it does not last long in our house!

Kohlrabi and Turnip Spicy Asian Slaw

For the Dressing:

kholrabi slaw-091016-0002

Ingredients

  • 1.5 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1.5 tbsp toasted sesame oil
  • 1.5 tbsp tamari, soy sauce, or Bragg’s Amino Acids
  • 1.5 tbsp rice vinegar
  • 2 or 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1.5 tsp sugar
  • Juice of 1/2 a lime
  • 5 thai chilis, sliced on the bias (or a seeded and chopped seranno  or jalapeno)
  • 1 small onion, thinly sliced

Method

Whisk together all ingredients except for the onion (you can also use a blender for this). Pour the dressing over the sliced onion in a large bowl, and set aside for half an hour to let the onions macerate slightly in the liquid. Stir occasionally.

For the salad

Ingredients

  • 1 large kohlrabi
  • 3-4 small turnips
  • 2 small carrots
  • 2 tablespoons black or white sesame seeds
  • 1 handful mint leaves, chopped
  • Other herbs of your choice (optional, but chopepd cilantro or parsley or thai basil would be nice)
  • Veggie “chick’n” strips (optional)

If your turnips still have their green tops attached, cut them off and set them aside for another use. Peel and trim all the veggies.

A food processor with the disk for shredding works best for the veggies. Shred all the veggies, and add them to the bowl with the onions and dressing. Add the sesame seeds, mint leaves, and “chick’n” strips and other herbs (if using). Toss the slaw to coat with dressing. Garnish with extra sesame seeds and herbs.

Serve right away, or tuck it into the fridge until you are ready. This lasts about 4 or 5 days in the fridge, but is best the day it’s made.
kholrabi slaw-091016-0001

Party Time Veggie Pressed Sammich

sammich-091004-0012Get ready to impress your friends at your next party…this beautiful sammich is bursting with garden veggie flavor and I am pretty sure that no one can resist its charms.

I won’t lie to you though, it takes a little planning. You need to make this sammich the day before you plan to serve it. Aside from that, you can make it as easy or as complicated as you want. And when  it’s party time, all you have to do is unwrap, slice, and serve. No last-minute rushing or fussing in the kitchen. It’s also very portable so you can take it with you if the party is offsite.

sammich-091003-0004The easiest way to make this  work is to use store bought items for the roasted red peppers, tapenade, and bread.

But I am a control freak in the kitchen, so I always make my own tapenade, grill or roast my own red peppers, cook my own beans, and make two loaves of ciabatta from scratch.

So do it however you like, it will still be delicious. I am not going to post recipes for tapenade or ciabatta here, because I trust you can find recipes you like if you want to do everything by hand.sammich-090920-0002

Note that you will have to make the chick pea filling, which was inspired by my girl Kelley of StoneArch Cakery. But it’s really easy and TOTALLY worth it.

This recipe makes enough for two mega huge sammiches, but cut it in half if you don’t need that much. If you have any veggies left over, they will keep in the fridge, and are great to toss into wraps, salads, pizzas, etc.

Party Time Veggie Pressed Sammich

Ingredients

  • 3 cups cooked chickpeas (which is 1 cup dried beans, soaked and cooked)
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 6 large cloves garlic
  • 3 tbsp tomato paste (this is half of one of those 6oz cans)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • pepper, to taste

  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 1/3 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon herbes de provence
  • 3/4 tsp salt
  • pepper, to taste
  • 6-8 roasted red peppers
  • Assorted vegetables for grilling or roasting (I usually use 2 small eggplants, 4-5 zucchini, 4-5 yellow squash, 2 large onions)

  • 1 cup tapenade (home made or store bought)
  • 1 8oz. tub Tofutti cream cheese
  • A large bunch of basil
  • Two large flat loaves of bread, such as ciabatta or focaccia

sammich-091004-0014

Method

TO MAKE THE CHICK PEA FILLING

Put the chick peas, peeled garlic cloves, lemon juice, tomato paste, and salt and pepper into your food processor. Grab your jar of roasted red peppers and tip about 1/4 cup of the liquid into a measuring cup, then add half of that to the food processor. Process until you get a stiff paste, adding slightly more of the red pepper liquid if needed. (This needs to be a pretty stiff mixture, if it’s too runny it will make the bread damp, and will drip out of your sandwich onto your guests’ laps.) Refrigerate until ready to use. You can make this up to 4 days in advance.

TO MAKE THE VEGETABLES

sammich-091003-0006

Good news: Veggies can also be prepped 2-3 days in advance and stored in the fridge until you are ready to use them.

Slice your veggies about 3/8 inch thick (for skinnier squashes and eggplants, I like to slice on the diagonal so that I get bigger planks). In a large bowl, whisk together the olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt, pepper, and herbes de provence. Toss your veggies in the marinade and then pull them out and let the extra marinade drain off in a colander or on a cooling rack set over a cookie sheet. (You may need to make a little extra marinade, depending on the amount of veggies you have.)

TIP: To prep your onions for grilling, cut 1/2 inch rounds, and thread them onto bamboo skewers that have been soaked in water for at least 30 minutes. This will keep your grilled oniony goodness from falling through the grill grates.

If GRILLING: Set the grill on high and give it a scrub with a wire brush. Reduce the heat to meduim, and arrange your veggies in a single layer. Grill about 5 minutes per side, or until you get some nice grill marks and tender veggies (cooking times may vary depending on your grill). Try to avoid charring the crap out of your veggies. You will probably need to do several batches.

If ROASTING: Pre-heat the oven to 400 degrees. Arrange veggies in a single layer on parchment paper or a greased cookie sheet. Cook 10 minutes, flip the veggies, and return to the oven for another 10 minutes, or until they are tender.

TO ASSEMBLE
sammich-091003-0008 sammich-091003-0009
sammich-091003-0010 sammich-091003-0011

Grab your ciabatta or focaccia, and with your knife blade parallel to the countertop, slice the bread the long way so that you get two large open-faced halves. Hollow out the interior crumb of the bread to make space for the filling. Repeat with the other loaf.

TIP: Save that bread that you pulled out! Toss it in the food processor and make bread crumbs. Store them in a zip top bag in the freezer until you need them.

Take the bottom half of the first loaf of bread, and spread half of the Tofutti cream cheese over it, making sure that there is no bare bread poking through. (This is important to “waterproof” the bottom of your sammich; without this, the bottom gets soggy from the vegetables.) Spread half of the tapenade overtop of the cream cheese. Layer your onions over that, then follow with a layer of eggplant, and a layer of squash and/or zucchini. Grab 3-4 roasted red peppers an spread those out over top.

Take the corresponding top half of the bread and spread the chick pea filling over top. Make a layer of whole basil leaves over this, pressing them into the filling. Carefully take the top layer of the bread, and place it over the bottom half. Wrap the whole thing tightly in plastic wrap. Repeat with the other loaf.

Place both wrapped sandwiches on a large cookie sheet. Place another cookie sheet on top of the sandwiches. Place the cookie sheets in the fridge, and put something heavy on top. Jars of tomato sauce or soup work great for this.

Let the sammich sit for 8-18 hours. When ready to serve, remove the plastic wrap, and use a bread knife to carefully slice the sandwich into squares.

sammich-091004-0015

Grilled Pizza

grilled-pizza-091002-0004My brother Dave came over to visit the other day, and–since it was around dinner time, and since he is the designated family grill meister–we made grilled pizza.grilled-pizza-091002-0001

If you’ve never had grilled pizza, you MUST try it. It’s easy to prepare, FUN to make, and very tasty to eat. This is a really great thing to do with guests too, because everything can be prepped in advance. AND everyone can have their own pizza JUST the way they like it.

For grilled pizza, I use an America’s Test Kitchen recipe for the crust, but I think any pizza dough recipe would work fine, as long as you rolled it out a little thicker than you normally would.

grilled-pizza-091002-0002 I love getting creative with our toppings, and this week I put out roasted red peppers, diced shallots, chopped jalapenos, sliced green olives, and tomato salad. But out of three of us I I was the only one who used ALL of those things on one pizza!

So the way this works is that you take the rolled-out dough to your hot grill and cook just one side. We have a Weber grill with burners that run the length of the grill from side to side, and I picked up a few tips from Dave this week on the best way to cook pizza on this type of grill: grilled-pizza-091002-0003

  • He got the grill roaring hot first with all burners on high, and cleaned the grate with a wire brush.
  • He turned off the burners and then cautiously sprayed it with non-stick cooking spray (you may still get a momentary flare up so be super careful).
  • He turned the grill back on, but set the middle burners as low as they would go.
  • The outer two burners were turned on to just a few ticks above medium.
  • He cooked our pizza in the middle of the grill via the indirect heat of the outer two burners.

Tip: If  you have a grill where the burners run front to back, these hints from Dave will still apply, but your primary heat sources will be the sides instead of the front and back.

grilled-pizza-091002-0005So once Dave had cooked all of our pizza dough rounds on one side, we brought them into the kitchen and arranged our sauce and toppings on the cooked side. (Did I forget to mention that we also had some of the amazing Daiya cheese? Cos we did.)

Then the pizzas went back out onto the grill to finish cooking. Dave left the grill lid closed pretty much the whole time to allow the cheese and toppings to cook, but he did check the underneath of our pizzas a few times to make sure they weren’t cooking too fast.

The result was AWESOME pizza with beautiful grill marks, a crispy crust, and excellent flavor. Each one was a work of art. They were almost too pretty to eat…ALMOST…. :)